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Evergreen, Sometimes Alabaster

web posted January 22, 2016

LIFE DOWN SOUTH- Before satellites, come winter, we primitive Southern kids dreamed of snow. In those uncomplicated days, we had no Weather Channel to tell us days in advance snow was coming. It either came or it didn’t, and most of the time it didn’t. But when it did, well, it ferried kids to the Land of the Midnight Sun.

The big question was, “How many inches?” A fellow primitive resurrects a magical memory: “One night in February 1958, 8 to 14 inches of snow fell. My prayers were more than answered as I watched chicken-feather-size flakes blow across the yard, caught in the light from the front stoop. I’d run out into the front yard every 15 minutes to measure it with a ruler.”

Most of the time we got a dusting. Sometimes more. A deep snow created a winter wonderland rare and sublime, and Mother Nature’s new architecture redefined all that was familiar into white lines and soft, glistening curves.

Freshly fallen snow meant a chance to walk through dead-quiet woods that suddenly were filled with Vermont maples. Lowly pines transformed into graceful ballerinas. They had become, for a moment, sugar plum fairies, evergreen, but dressed so very fine in brilliant rime-like alabaster.






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